A multilevel cognitive model of coming out

Tomasz Dyrmo

Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza w Poznaniu


Abstract

The article explores coming out narratives, as its starting point employing a multilevel
approach to this phenomenon in line with a model proposed by Zoltan Kӧvecses (2017),
applying image schemas, domains and frames, and metaphor scenarios. It describes how
these levels interact with each other to construe the metaphoric meaning at the level
of mental structures which motivate linguistic choices in coming out narratives concerning
sexual orientation or gender identity. The analysis of the linguistic material reveals that
highly individualised coming out narratives are underpinned by less complex cognitive
mechanisms.


Keywords:

coming out, conceptual metaphor, iteraction, multilevel metaphor


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Published
2022-12-15

Cited by

Dyrmo, T. (2022). A multilevel cognitive model of coming out. Prace Językoznawcze, 24(4), 27–43. https://doi.org/10.31648/pj.8159

Tomasz Dyrmo 
Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza w Poznaniu



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